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For patients with high blood pressure.. 4 changes in your lifestyle that will help you control it


If you have treatment-resistant high blood pressure, you'll probably be interested to know that research revealed in the Journal of the American Heart Association Circulation suggests that by making four major changes to your lifestyle, you can lower your blood pressure, according to What the "eatthis" website said.


The study, which was conducted at Duke University School of Medicine in America, titled “Treatment of Resistant Hypertension Using Lifestyle Modification to Promote Health (TRIUMPH)” confirmed that treatment-resistant hypertension patients can lower their blood pressure by participating in regular aerobic exercise in nature. Lose weight, reduce the amount of salt in their food, and continue to take prescribed medications.


Women over the age of 40 should be encouraged to check their blood pressure regularly to avoid heart attacks, the study said. Moreover, people with high blood pressure may also benefit from following the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, which includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, and other foods. Dairy that does not contain a high amount of fat, again staying away from salt.


Study participants made modest lifestyle changes, losing 5-10% of their body weight, said Bethany Baron Gibbs, a volunteer doctor at the American Heart Association, noting that these lifestyle changes can have many other health benefits. Other than blood pressure, such as improved mood, sleep, musculoskeletal health, glucose control, lower lipids, and many other benefits.



The study emphasized that clinicians should continue to promote lifestyle changes for patients, regardless of the severity of their illness, that may have a positive impact on their health and allow patients to reduce the number of medications they need.


The study indicated that following a healthy lifestyle brings huge gains, even for people whose blood pressure remains high, despite taking antihypertensive medications.

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